Amy Nostbakken and Norah Sadava on Grey Gardens



With their new movie Mouthpiece playing in Toronto and Los Angeles right now, co-writers and co-stars Amy Nostbakken and Norah Sadava drop in to discuss another unforgettable double act: Big Edie and Little Edie, as preserved and examined in the 1976 documentary Grey Gardens. Your genial host Norm Wilner has some thoughts about the raccoons.


Georgina Reilly on The Sound of Music



You know her from PontypoolThe L.A. Complex and Murdoch Mysteries, and now you can hear Georgina Reilly — whose latest movie Goalie drops on iTunes Canada this Friday, June 7th — stand up for The Sound of Music, Robert Wise’s Oscar-winning musical about a family that sang its way out of Nazi-occupied Austria. Your genial host Norm Wilner is willing to see where this is going.


Kulap Vilaysack on Attack the Block



Writer, producer, actor and podcaster Kulap Vilaysack — whose moving personal documentary Origin Story is now streaming on Amazon Prime Video — throws down for the retro delights of Joe Cornish’s Attack the Block, the 2011 SF thriller that pitted John Boyega, Jodie Whitaker, Franz Drameh and Nick Frost against an invasion of gorilla-wolf aliens. Your genial host Norm Wilner thinks you’ll like the way this one turned out.


Robin McKenna on Dead Man



Filmmaker Robin McKenna, whose new documentary Gift is playing at the Carlton Cinema in Toronto right now, rides for the dreamy landscapes and flowing score of Jim Jarmusch’s entrancing alt-Western Dead Man. Your genial host Norm Wilner is happy to saddle up for this one.


Ramona Barckert on Can You Ever Forgive Me



Writer and producer Ramona Barckert — whose new film Ordinary Days is now playing in Toronto, Halifax and Edmonton — stops by on a rainy day to discuss Marielle Heller’s Can You Ever Forgive Me? and the spiky pleasure to be had in watching Melissa McCarthy and Richard E. Grant engage in petty larceny. Not that your genial host Norm Wilner would ever condone such behavior, of course.


Jocelyn Geddie on Carrie



Writer, performer and future podcast prom queen Jocelyn Geddie (The BeavertonI Hate It But I Love It) throws down for the queasy high-school horror movie that is Brian de Palma’s Carrie — the first big-screen Stephen King adaptation, and one that still packs a hell of a punch. Your genial host Norm Wilner wasn’t expecting to laugh quite so hard for this one.


Charlie Lyne on The Clock



Recorded in his London edit suite, filmmaker Charlie Lyne — director of Beyond CluelessFear Itself and the newly released Lasting Marks — breaks our format with The Clock, Christian Marclay’s 2010 gallery installation that uses the entirety of cinema and television to tell you the current time. Your genial host Norm Wilner wandered into it once at the Southbank Centre.


Ricardo Hoyos on Dumb and Dumber



Actor and musician Ricardo Hoyos — most recently seen beachside in Travis Knight’s Bumblebee — tackles the Farrelly brothers’ Dumb and Dumber and the manic delight that is the young, hungry Jim Carrey. Your genial host Norm Wilner popped out the cap in his tooth for this one.


John Ross Bowie on Topsy-Turvy



In town for the opening of Four Chords and a Gun, his new play about Phil Spector and The Ramones, actor and author John Ross Bowie finds a strange connection to his own work in Topsy-Turvy, Mike Leigh’s layered 1999 drama about Gilbert, Sullivan and The Mikado. Your genial host Norm Wilner is all ears.


Natty Zavitz on Love in the Afternoon



Writer-director Natty Zavitz, whose new film Acquainted just opened in Toronto and Vancouver, tackles the last of Eric Rohmer’s Six Moral Tales: Love in the Afternoon, the 1972 drama starring Bernard Verley as a happily married man drawn to the possibility of a new lover. Your genial host Norm Wilner dedicates this episode to the launch of the Criterion Channel.